Visit our new Expression Swing

The Parks Dept installed an Expression Swing this week at the Madisonville City Park. Expression Swing is a GameTime exclusive and the industry's first playground swing that promotes inter-generational play as adults and children swing together. The face-to-face design features a bucket seat for children under 5 and a comfortable adult swing that allows a parent and child to interact with each other and to experience one another's facial expressions while at play.

Continue Reading

 Print  Email

New Ladder Truck

Ladder-Truck-Photo-One

Madisonville Fire Department begin looking for ways to replace its 1987 102' Rear Mount Ladder truck a few years back. The truck had numerous mechanical problems and was a open cab vehicle, which posed a serious risk to firefighters. Due to the overwhelming cost of this truck, the fire department applied for a AFG Assistance to Firefighters Grant. The AFG grant was turned down 5 years in a row.  In 2013 the AFG allowed vehicle grants to be applied for as a regional grant.

MFD decided to apply for this using the regional approach. It took into account all the run volume, vehicles, and staffing for the entire county.  In late 2013 MFD was awarded its AFG grant for $1,100,000 for its new ladder truck. It was also awarded $25,000 for additional NFPA required equipment, for the truck. MFD members looked at several different options for a new truck. It was determined that a Mid-Mount truck would best suit our needs.

Continue Reading

 Print  Email

The Founding Years

image

In 1807 Madisonville was founded on 40 acres of land donated by Daniel McGary and Solomon Silkwood.  By 1810, Madisonville was a bustling home to 37 people.  The little town was home to a tavern, three general stores, a cabinet shop, a blacksmith and a tanner.  Growth was slow at first but by 1830 the town had grown to almost four times the population.  With the growth in population came the growth in businesses and services.  The Eagle Hotel was erected on the northeast corner of Main and Main Cross (Center) Streets sometime in the 1850s.  The building was razed in 1906 to make way for the Farmers Bank and Trust Company. 

Continue Reading

 Print  Email

Population Trends and Growth

image

In 1807 Daniel McGary and Soloman Silkwood each donated twenty acres to establish the City of Madisonville.  When the town was laid out, it consisted of two main streets.  Main Street ran north and south and Main Cross ran east and west.  In the survey of 1822, only Main Street and Main Cross were designated.  As Madisonville was to be the county seat, it must have a Court House.  So in August 1807 the contract for building the Court House and jail was granted to Soloman Silkwood.  In 1810, records show that there were 37 people living in Madisonville.

Continue Reading

 Print  Email

Madisonville, KY | 1900-1939

image

On Monday, January 1, 1900 the twentieth century began in Madisonville, Kentucky much as it did in many other Kentucky communities.  Madisonville was, at the turn of the century, a small county seat city with a population of 3,628 and served as the governmental and commercial center for the 30,995 persons living in Hopkins County. (Population statistics for Madisonville researched by Mr. Vernon M. Smith of KSDC in Louisville, Kentucky).  The promise of a new century may have been in the thoughts of some residents, merchants, professionals, and government officials as they prepared for the workweek ahead.  Who among them could have envisioned just what the next forty years would bring to their community.  Each of the next four decades would present the city with challenges and opportunities from within the region and state, as well as from national and international events.

Continue Reading

 Print  Email

Coal Mining Around Madisonville

image

The first coal known to have been burned in Hopkins County was from a barrel brought from Pennsylvania.  This was in a grate in the Weir and Wilkins store on East Center Street across from the north entrance of the courthouse.

In 1838, the state legislature commissioned William Williams Mather, Ohio State Geologist, to conduct a Reconnaissance Survey of Kentucky’s minerals.  Mather’s survey was amazingly accurate with the minimum amount of information available.  Mather delineated both the Eastern and Western coal fields.

Continue Reading

 Print  Email

More Articles ...